Valentine’s for Veterans

Spread some love and kindness by making and sending Valentines for Veterans in Canada’s Armed Forces.

Valentines for Veterans is one of my favourite ways to teach kids about compassion, kindness and all that Canadian veterans have done for us.

“Each year, Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) invites Canadian schools, individuals and organizations to make Valentines for Vets. VAC then distributes the valentines to Veterans in long-term care facilities across the country by February 14.” – VAC website

Started in the United States in 1989 thanks to a call out from newspaper columnist Ann Landers, Valentines for Veterans was born. Canada adopted the practice in 1996.

image courtesy of VAC website

It’s such a small gesture, but it really has a big impact. A few years ago when we went to visit my husband’s grandmother, a veteran, and she had a valentine of her own. She absolutely loved it! And since then, I make sure we send some each year so others can smile as big as Nanny did.

The premise is simple, make a few extra Valentines and send them to Veterans Affairs Canada. They will distribute them to vets all over Canada. Teachers and Librarians are huge helpers when it comes to encouraging kids and families to make Valentines for Vets. With schools not in-person and libraries are not open this year, I expect there will be far fewer Valentines made – so let’s do our part!

 

Sending Valentines for Veterans

If you would like to send a valentine thanking a Veteran, please send it by February 1 to:

Valentines for Vets
Veterans Affairs Canada
Commemoration, Distribution Unit
125 Maple Hills Avenue
Charlottetown, PE  C1C 0B6

Veterans Affairs Canada will keep valentines that arrive after the deadline to distribute next year.

 

Tips for Creating Your Valentines

  1. Please do not include candy or chocolate with the valentines.
  2. Do not use sparkles or materials that easily break off the valentines.
  3. Encourage your kids to sign their valentines and to write a bit about themselves—their age, and what school they attend. However, do not include addresses or phone numbers.
  4. Do not put individual valentines in sealed envelopes. Send us a single large envelope containing all of the valentines.
  5. Do not put the date or year on the Valentines.
  6. Ensure your students/children are aware of who Veterans are—they are living and were men and women who served in the military. Avoid using “RIP” and images related to violence or death such as graveyards or guns.

Need Some Message Ideas?

The Veterans Affairs Canada website has some great tips and some examples of messages kids have sent.

 

 

Find More Valentine’s Day Activities Here

Valentines That Aren’t Candy

 

valentines for veterans
Handmade Valentines from Active Parents’ first Valentines for Vets event.
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